Lead SALead SA

Nal’ibali wants dads on board to raise a generation of responsible young men

Written by: Tlou Legodi

According to an article in the Mail & Guardian, the amount of time fathers spend reading with their children is one of the best ways of predicting how well their children will read and write in the future.

And, because children who read regularly for pleasure perform better in the classroom, regardless of their family’s financial or social status, fathers everywhere can easily give their children a powerful academic boost simply by spending time reading and sharing stories with them.

What’s more, the time spent reading together will have the added benefit of building a deep, emotional bond, contributing to their children’s wellbeing.

This June Nal’ibali — the national reading-for-enjoyment campaign — is focusing on fathers and father figures and the powerful role men can play in their children’s lives, simply by reading and spending time with them.

This is all the more reason to read and connect with your children this Father’s Day.

Joanne Joseph on Afternoon Drive speaks to Nal’ibali head of communications Ben Rycroft.

In a country like South Africa where we have a lot of absent fathers, we have a lot of children who are raised primarily by female caregivers. They don't have the opportunity.

Ben Rycroft, Head of communications - Nal’ibali

There is a bit of misconception that the educating and nurturing of children is purely a female task. We need to debunk that and what we are trying to do is to use Fathers' Day as an opportunity to shed some light and try to create an open dialogue with people, with fathers, with communities and father figures to see that this can actually be an extremely rewarding thing for children to have their dads, uncles and great-grandfathers read to them.

Ben Rycroft, Head of communications - Nal’ibali

If we want to raise a generation of young men who are gentlemen and are aware of the role of women in the household, we need to model that behaviour, show them through action.

Ben Rycroft, Head of communications - Nal’ibali

Research is showing that reading aloud to a child for a minimum of 15 minutes a day will make a huge difference to a child's literacy ability.

Ben Rycroft, Head of communications - Nal’ibali

Listen below for the full conversation ...


This article first appeared on 702 : Nal’ibali wants dads on board to raise a generation of responsible young men




Read next from articles

[LISTEN] Read Aloud Day: How Nal'ibali is promoting literacy

[LISTEN] Read Aloud Day: How Nal'ibali is promoting literacy

Literary mentor Portia Daniso speaks to Joanne Joseph about what they're doing to expose children to storytelling and its benefits.
Read on...

[LISTEN] The importance of reading out loud

[LISTEN] The importance of reading out loud

Azania spoke with Nal'ibali Literacy Mentor Sithembiso Nhlapo as Friday marks World Read Aloud Day.
Read on...

Nal'ibali aim to reach 1 million children on World Read Aloud Day

Nal'ibali aim to reach 1 million children on World Read Aloud Day

David Harrison, CEO of DG Murray Trust explains how you can help the Nal'ibali's World Read Aloud Day.
Read on...

Ibali Project helps youth capture their stories through photography

Ibali Project helps youth capture their stories through photography

The program encourages young people from underprivileged communities to share their stories through the medium of photography.
Read on...

Nali'bali to commemorate literacy month with bilingual storytelling contest

Nali'bali to commemorate literacy month with bilingual storytelling contest

Storytelling has earned its place as an important tradition. Azania Mosaka speaks to Storyteller Gcina Mhlope.
Read on...

Celebrate your 67 minutes on Mandela Day reading for a child - Nal'ibali

Celebrate your 67 minutes on Mandela Day reading for a child - Nal'ibali

South Africa's' children are awarded an opportunity to read a simplified version of Long Walk to Freedom on Mandela day.
Read on...